Do You Need A License To Run? 

Do You Need A License To Run? 

A license to run?

A license to run?

Do you need a license to run?  Of course not, at least I cannot imagine a condition where one would need a license to run. But, one does need a license to proclaim themselves as an architect! A conversation with Wendy, a graduate architect in my office today made me realize the direct link between becoming a better runner and becoming a licensed architect!

Wendy recently learned she has reached the point in her path to becoming an architect where she is eligible to begin the professional exam process.  Having worked with Wendy much of this past year I have no doubts she will succeed in her exam process. Nonetheless, I suggested to her that she seek out some study partners as it would help to secure her success and help keep her on schedule to complete all five separate exams.

Architectural student preparing to take NCARB exam.

Architectural student preparing to take NCARB exam.

You need to understand what it takes to become an architect. I could probably fill my entire thumb drive if I were to reveal all of the requirements. Simply stated it’s a long and difficult but also a very rewarding process. Like completing a marathon, becoming a licensed architect is a grueling process that requires time, dedication, perseverance, setbacks, and thrills. They each represent a great personal achievement. 

Becoming an architect requires a professional degree from an accredited school of architecture. At a minimum this is a five year process and more likely a six year process.  Following the degree the potential architect must obtain employment working under the tutelage of another licensed architect. This is typically referred to as the internship. Similar to the medical profession, architects must obtain and document required minimum professional experience in all aspects of professional practice. Internship usually requires three to five years to complete the requirements in the prescribed areas of professional practice.

Once the internship is completed the real fun begins, for this is where the potential architect must go through a rigorous series of six separate (and expensive) licensing exams. These exams cover the topics of structure, design, technology, professional practice, and more.  It’s not unusual for many candidates to take as long as a year or more to successfully pass all of the exams. Once passed only then can they claim themselves to be an architect! 

So what does this have to do with becoming a better runner?

Well, I am a firm believer that running in groups or running with a partner that challenges you makes you a better runner.  When running alone it’s easy for a runner to back down from a pace, loose mental focus, generally become distracted, or simply cut a scheduled workout short. 

Running with groups or friends will improve your running.

Running with groups or friends will improve your running.

Running with a partner, especially one that challenges you, at minimum gets you out the door to complete a workout!  There is also that natural tendency to compete with one another meaning you will not be the one to stop running because you’re running faster or farther than normal.  Then, as most runners already know, runners love to talk running, and non-runners are not interested in what runners have to say. Runners will listen to other runners.  So during a long run, it’s not unusual for runners to carry on a continual conversation.  Such conversations also work to bolster the runner’s oxygen intake thereby improving their ability to run farther and faster.

So what does running with a partner have to do with becoming an architect?

Well, the exam portion of the licensing process is long, tedious, and if done alone, very boring. It’s also extremely tempting to not push oneself too. But if the future architect can connect with a co-worker or an old college classmate, the process of not only completing the exams becomes easier, the likelihood of passing each exam the first time increases too! 

Completing a major accomplishment on one’s own is always something to be proud of completing. There is also the recognition that doing so completely on one’s own is extremely rare and more difficult. So take advantage of options available to you to complete your next race goal or personal achievement and seek supportive help.

Thanks for taking the time to read my post today, wish Wendy luck with her exams, and remember I am here to help you become a better runner and if necessary also a better architect!

Run Happy!

Coach Lee

Glass City Half Marathon - Race Report

Glass City Half Marathon - Race Report

Which Type of Runner Are You?

Which Type of Runner Are You?